We have an insane calling to be where we aren't

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Seabeck, WA

Located on the western shores of the Kitsap Peninsula, Seabeck is a charming, historic waterfront community with scenic water and mountains views, beach access year-round.
Living on the water makes a person aware of the tides and the affects on the wildlife. When there is a big tide, the eagles come out to feed. We drove the short distance to Seabeck as the tide was expected to be very negative. And the Bald Eagles were out.
Between the starfish and eagles the clams don't have a chance, which the local residents of Seabeck really don't appreciate. Lots of clammering for the clams.

Monday, June 10, 2013

Victoria, BC

I always wanted to see Vancouver Island, British Columbia. This was my chance. On my days off from work, we would go to the northern section of the Olympic Peninsula. This time we took a day to ride the Blackball Ferry to Victoria.
Once again, we loaded the bikes on the ferry and headed north. The ride was 90 minutes across the Strait de Juan de Fuca. We met some very nice people from Sequim that gave us some tips on where to have lunch and ride our bikes.
It happened to be a very nice day. The cyclists were out in full force.
I hope to return someday. I don't think we saw the tip of the iceberg. What another great day.

Friday, June 7, 2013

Fort Worden and Whidbey Island

One of our favorite places to camp in Fort Worden in Port Townsend. There is a lighthouse and we would watch the ships sail by. You can see the cruise ships in the distance and an occasional submarine with escort sail by. We spent afternoons sitting in the sand just daydreaming and talking. Port Townsend does allow overnight stays in its visitor center parking lot for no charge and is across the street from Safeway.
In the morning, we would ride our bikes back to the ferry to go to Whidbey Island. Coupesville is a great stop. Coupeville, the “town of Sea Captains” is the second oldest town in Washington State.
Washington state has so much to offer. No wonder I want to return.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Seattle, WA

The Washington State Ferry System is a great way to spend the day, even if all I do is ride back and forth across Puget Sound. It never gets old.
The ride takes an hour. We would either walk on or ride our bikes but have taken our vehicle across.
Seattle has quite an expensive cost of living. Many people commute from Bremerton every morning to the city. The ladies often are putting on their makeup and fixing their hair in the restrooms during the crossing.
On this day, we rode our bikes to the Ballard Locks which is one of Seattle’s most popular tourist attractions, especially during the sunny months. The grounds also feature a fish ladder and the Carl S. English Jr. Botanical Garden. The Hiram M. Chittenden Locks, opened in 1917 and often nicknamed the Ballard Locks, provides a link for boats between the salt water of Puget Sound and the fresh water of the Ship Canal, which connects eastward to Lake Union and Lake Washington. Then we were on to Gasworks Park. After a day in the city, getting on the ferry and heading home I find myself dozing off.

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Port Orchard, WA

One of my favorite bike rides while living in Bremerton was out of Port Orchard. We would ride along Puget Sound thru Manchester to the Ferry Port in Southward.
We could take the small boat from Bremerton to Port Orchard but it was easier to park in PO. We would often pass cycling clubs from Seattle that would take the ferry over and ride to Bremerton and return by ferry.
It was fun to watch the clams spitting water when the tide was out. People would wave as we rode by.
Manchester State Park looks like a great place to camp. We would stop there sometimes just to wander. The mornings can be chilly but dress warm.

Friday, May 31, 2013

Hurricane Ridge

Hurricane Ridge is located 17 miles south of Port Angeles on Hurricane Ridge Road, off Mount Angeles Road. When I worked in Seattle a few years ago, we wanted to see this area but happened to be closed the days we were there. Fortunately, this time we made it to the top.
Hurricane Ridge has a number of hiking trails, from ridgetop traverses to steep trails that descend to subalpine lakes and valleys. The weather constantly changing along with the terrain.
Sometimes you have to change the direction of your hike. We chose to go to a lower elevation.
As we hiked thru the rainforest, we only saw a couple of other people and it was eerie at timesIt turned out to be quite a day of being outdoors.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Gig Harbor to Point Defiance Park inTacoma

The Cushman Trail in Gig Harbor in southern Kitsap Peninsula the over the Narrows Bridge and on to Point Defiance Park is a great day outing. Often people get lost once they cross the bridge and have to take the road to the park.
Looping around the outer rim of the park is Five Mile Drive. The entire path is paved and has stopping points so you can take in the impressive views of the water, surrounding islands and landmasses, mountains, and the Narrows Bridge.
These gardens are free to enter and feature pools, a waterfall, a bridge, and lovely landscaped flowers and trees. At the center of the gardens is the Pagoda, a temple-inspired structure built in 1914
Fort Nisqually is a living history museum perfect for a family day out. Volunteers and staff members dress up as historical figures going about daily activities of the 1800s. We attended the Taste Of Tacooma and had bands and lots of food.